Archive for ‘Pets’

April 23, 2017

Revamp, Renew, Revive (a.k.a. – What The Cats Left Behind)

Sometimes we can dream, make plans and see our dreams come to fruition, but then a couple of cats come along and sabotage our dreams in a flash.

As a landscape designer, I’ve been trained to try and plan for everything when designing a site; accessibility, location, exposure, sight lines, potential hazards, storage, screening, water, fire, gardens, pets, allergies… the list goes on.  Somehow, in the years I’ve been doing this, I was never trained to envision that new cats will move into the neighborhood 4 or 5 years down the road and use your dream project as a toilet.

Unfortunately, it happens and it has happened.  I’ve been gardening for many years and have had rabbits destroy plants, squirrels steal fruits and veggies to take a bite out of them and leave them behind and deer do pruning for me. While all of those things are annoying, it is nothing like finding your neighbor’s cats’ waste in the space that you grow food in. It is infuriating, disgusting, repulsing and when you have a young child, dangerous to their health.

When I discovered the cat mess in my garden, I knew immediately I needed to stop this from happening again, but in the back of my mind I also knew the damage had already been done and can’t be fixed so I would need to come up with a new plan. I know for a fact these cats kill birds and rodents on a regular basis so the likelihood of the cats having toxoplasmosis is pretty high, meaning it’s also in their poo and likely in our garden now.

So what am I going to do about it? Revamp, renew and revive.

I’ll be honest, when I first started thinking about how to handle this, my first thought was to gather the poo and deliver it to my neighbor’s doorstep, but I didn’t think that would be appropriate or make for a very good neighbor relationship. It could be argued that neither is moving into a new neighborhood behind a nature center, feeding the birds and then letting your cats out to kill the birds, spray your neighbor’s house and use their garden as a litter box, but I digress. Poo delivery is out.

I also thought about fencing, but we already have a privacy fence around the back yard and since we live on a corner, we are restricted on both the height and location of the fence, not to mention fences can be costly.  Plus, a fence in front of a fence wouldn’t look so hot and… cats can jump. Fencing is out.

I thought about putting a deterrent spray or powder around the garden, but I would have to be diligent about applying it in order to (hopefully) keep them out.  Not what I want to spend my summer doing. Spraying is out.

I thought about getting a motion activated sprinkler, but I know myself.  I would sit there smugly thinking I’ve got them, evil laugh to myself envisioning the cats being startled, hair standing on end and getting sprayed and then promptly forget that the sprinkler is on and end up being the recipient of the cold blast of water instead of my neighbor’s cats.  Sprinkler is out.

Finally, I settled on the plan I was really dragging my feet on… move the garden.  It’s hard to say goodbye to 5 years of planning, planting and work, but it really seems like the best option. It’s time to revamp the front garden and move the food to the back yard.

So the new plan for the front is to leave the honey berry, currants and perennials where they are and turn the veggie space into a cutting flower garden. This will allow the space to be utilized for something attractive and still stay in line with my chemical-free “bee safe” yard and better yet, turn it into a pollinators paradise.  My loss turns into a win for the pollinators.  I call that a win-win.

On to the renewal and revival!  The back yard garden was all but abandoned over the past few years with my energy being focused on the front yard garden, pregnancy, new baby and lack of time. Now that I’m past the initial anger of the situation, and our newest is old enough to hang out with me in the garden, I’m really embracing the revival of our back yard.

Here’s a little peak as to what I’m doing with the raised beds. Any guesses?

20170423_160057

More on that in the near future!

Happy spring, happy planting and cheers to an abundant season!

Kate

Advertisements
Tags:
April 24, 2013

Natura Pet Food/Treat Recall

a-to-z-letters-n

I realize this is a bit of an odd post, and it wasn’t what I had intended on posting for “N” (the original post is about nitrogen fixers in the lawn and garden, but we’ll get to that another day).

Instead, this is a public service announcement.

April 19, 2013 – Natura Pet Products is voluntarily expanded its March 29, 2013 recall of dry pet foods because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. The expanded recall now includes all dry pet food products and treats with expiration dates prior to and including March 24, 2014.

This recall includes the following brands:

Innova
EVO
California Natural
HealthWise
Karma

I’m using this post for this notification because I first heard about this recall last night on the news and I figured that if I hadn’t heard about it until now, there might be others that missed this information as well.

Salmonella contamination can make our pets sick as well as transfer to other animals and humans.

If you use one of the above listed brands, please visit the Natura website for further information about this recall.

Kate

April 19, 2012

P is for Gardening with Pets

Many of us have a four-legged friend or two with whom we share our life.  They are our companions and friends and often become part of the family.  They greet us when we get home.  They love us unconditionally.  They snuggle.  They protect us.  They have a sixth sense to know when we’re sick or down and come to just be by our side.  They’re the best!

Until they’re not.  There is nothing more frustrating to a gardener than working so hard to grow flowers, plants, veggies, to watch them mature and just begin to peak only to have them trampled, dug up or otherwise destroyed.  Now it’s one thing when it’s a “wild” animal that does it: a raccoon, a squirrel, a rabbit or a deer, somehow it feels okay to get angry, to want them out, gone.  It becomes a battle.  Us against them. We put up fences and spray our plants with pepper spray and put fox urine powder around and whatever it takes to keep it from happening again.

But what about when it’s that four-legged friend who did the damage, that companion who greets you at the door?  What then?  The anger feels different.  The anger gets channeled as frustration.  Instead of referring to them as “those dirty rats” thoughts of anger show up as feelings of betrayal.  After all, they’re with us everyday.  Chances are they are hanging out when we were planting.  How could they not know that we loved that plant, that we wanted to keep the flowers on top of the stem, high in the air, not lying in tattered bits on the ground, or that we really did want to eat that lettuce they just went running through and smashed?

Is it possible to have pets and a garden?  Yes!  However, it’s takes observation and flexibility.  When most of us start planning a garden, we usually have a fairy tale vision of what it will look like at its peak.  When you have pets, particularly dogs, sometimes those visions need adjusting.  And they might need to be adjusted more than once.

So where do you start?  Watch your pet.  Watch what the do from the moment they leave the house until the second they come back.  You’ll need to observe them for a while, in other words, more than once.  Watch where they go and what they do.  After a while you’ll start to notice patterns.  Then, once you know what their habits are, you get to adjust either yourself or their habits.

I’ll give you an example, my dog Jake.  Jake was a rescue dog from the Leech Lake Reservation.  Prior to being rescued Jake was essentially a feral dog.  He spent his days running with a pack, chasing chickens and dodging bee-bees (he has a few souvenirs in his legs as proof).  So what happens to a garden when a dog like Jake becomes a domestic pet?  Well, I’ll give you a glimpse, here are Jake’s habits:

1. We open the door, he slinks out onto the back step in stealth mode, scanning the yard for prey.

2. A squirrel!  He bolts from the back steps, runs across the patio, leaps off of the step, over the stepping stone pathway, lands in the grass, makes an arc in the yard as he races under the spruce tree, rounds the curve to the huge old elm and attempts to climb the base of the tree to catch the squirrel.

3. Defeated, he’ll sit at the base of the tree and stare, daring the squirrel to come down.  This stare-down can go on from a minute to an hour.

4. Once his watch is over he heads to the shed in hopes of catching the rabbits or the woodchuck that seem to take turns residing underneath.

5. Finally, he’ll cruise the perimeter of the yard and relieve himself before returning to the column by the back steps, assuming gargoyle position, to guard the yard for an undetermined amount of time.

Again, what does this mean for the yard/garden and what can be done?

1. Slinking and scanning, no harm done.

2. Bolting across the patio, no problem, he races through the designed-in traffic area.

3. Leaping off the step over the stepping stone path and landing in the grass has destroyed the lawn in that area and worn a dirt path.  Chances are I’m not going to be able to break him of this habit, so my choices are to deal with the daily mud (not fun) or create a path for him (with something other than mud).  It will need to be something smooth or soft: pavers, stepping-stones, pea gravel (no angular stones) or mulch.  Nothing that will hurt those tender pads on his feet.

4. Racing under the spruce tree.  Prior to Jake I had a little shade garden under the this tree.  I need to move it.  Actually, I only need to move what’s in his path and the plants near the base of the tree where he tries to jump at the squirrels.   The rest can stay.  I may add a little path through here as well because he occasionally comes in with spruce needles in his paws (ouch!).

5. Climbing the elm tree.  No harm done here.  There are no plants at the base (aside from lawn) and the tree is mature enough that he can’t hurt it.

6. Over to the shed.  This is a problem.  There are holes, three or four of them, created as a joint effort between the dogs, the rabbits and the woodchuck.  I need to determine whether we let the critters continue to live under there or try to get them out once and for all then block the holes with chicken wire (dug into the ground) and repair the holes or if I just deal with it and let the dogs enjoy the chase.  The other option is to train the dogs to stay away, but realistically this will only work if their source of entertainment is gone.

7.  Perimeter relief?  Kind of nice, actually.  They have to “go” and it’s nice to know where to look for it.  However, it has taken some training to teach him not to relieve himself on the perimeter where there are flowers and raspberries growing!

Okay, did you catch it?  Do you know how to deal with pets in the garden?

1. Observe their habits.

2. Go with the flow.  If you have a dog that loves to pace at the perimeter of your yard, let them!  Give them a path.  Move your flower beds out, away from the perimeter and give them access to get through.  The same goes for any other regular paths.  If you don’t like their path, you’ll need to provide and obstacle, a reason for them to take a different path.  And if you’re going to remove one, make sure you give them an alternative first.

3. Dog Digging?  Give them a spot to dig.  Their own sandbox perhaps.  Train them that it’s okay to dig here, but not “over there”.

4.  Keeping them out of gardens?  Fences, raised beds or container gardens and training!  Training your dog what’s okay and what’s not okay will be the best time you’ve ever spent.  It will make you both a lot happier!

5. Give them space.  Make sure your pets have a place to play that really is okay.

6. Supervise.  I know some people like to simply “let the dogs out” and forget about it.  If you’ve already done all of the above and you know your dog really well, and think they know the rules,  then go ahead, but please don’t think you can simply let the dogs out without training and taking precautions first and expect them to know where to go.  Dogs will be dogs.   They can’t read and they can’t read our minds.

7. Cats.  If you love them, keep them indoors, leash them, walk them (yes, it’s possible) or create a safe play area for them.

8. Cats can be destructive when left unattended outside and can become a gardeners nightmare.  They will mark territory, which smells offensive and usually isn’t the best way to be a good neighbor. If you’re dealing with your neighbors cats, this is tougher.  Cats typically don’t like the smell of citrus or lavender.  You can leave orange, lemon and lime peels in the garden (give them a little squeeze first to release the oils in the skin) or plant lavender.  There are also cleansers on the market to clean up outdoors post-cat spray and some others to deter them from coming again.  Both are supposed to be okay for plants and the environment.

9. Cats tend to use gardens and children’s sandboxes as a litter box.  Yuck!.  But beyond yuck, cat feces contain toxoplasmosis.  Toxoplasma gondii is a parasitic organism that can infect most animals and birds, but it only reproduces in cats, so cats are the parasite’s ultimate host. When a person becomes infected with toxoplasmosis, the parasite forms cysts that can affect almost any part of the body — often your brain and muscles, including the heart.  It dangerous for adults, particularly pregnant women, and especially young children.  To prevent cats from invading sandboxes, keep them covered.  Gardens?  There are little mats you can buy that have plastic spikes on them not sharp enough to hurt people, but just annoying enough to keep cats out of the soil.  Again, citrus or lavender may help as well.

10.  Cats also hunt birds, the same birds that you or your neighbors are feeding.  Feeders shouldn’t be bait for cats, and my guess is that most people feeding the birds aren’t intending it to be a buffet for cats.  It’s cruel to attract birds to a feeder, let cats loose and allow them to kill the birds.  Mice, moles and voles on the other hand…

11.  If you have a cat who likes to be outside, keep them with you, watch them, leash them or give them a play space… it can be outdoors, but covered, contained, somewhere they can sunbathe, watch the birds and squirrels, but not do damage to others.  I’ve seen some pretty cool outdoor cat play areas.  There are definitely options.

12. As a reminder, be careful what you grow.  Some plants are toxic to people and even more toxic to pets.  If your pets are in the back yard and you really want that Datura, grow it in the front.  It’s not worth taking chances.

13.  And finally, grow stuff for your pets too! Grow catnip or mint! (My cat isn’t fussy, any mint will do.)  Grow wheat grass, both dogs and cats like wheat grass.

So keep your companions and keep gardening.  Work together and you’ll have a yard and garden everyone will enjoy!

Kate

November 27, 2011

Still Thankful

I just wouldn’t feel right letting Thanksgiving go by without writing.

I had actually planned on writing prior to Thanksgiving Day, but that just wasn’t meant to be.  A few days before Thanksgiving I came down with the flu, you know, the full-blown body aches, fever, struggle to get out of bed flu.  Actually though, I was blessed.  It wasn’t the stomach flu.  And for that I was very, very thankful!

Nonetheless, I didn’t want the holiday to go by unacknowledged.  With all the craziness of the Christmas buying season starting as far back as October, pausing just long enough for all of us to take a few bites of turkey and a piece of pumpkin pie and then start right up again, I think it’s really important to stop, take a breath and look around at what really matters. Our health matters, our family and friends matter, having a roof over our head and food on the table matters, being loved matters.

There are so many negative things that we could focus on in the world right now that could be better, but it’s so important to take some time, pause and reflect on what’s going right.  What are we thankful for?

This year my health is something I’m incredibly thankful for.  You know that saying “you don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone”? I’m so grateful to have my health back.  I know I’ve mentioned it before, but the past couple of years were scary.  What’s weird is that when the fevers ended at the end of May and my fatigue started to fade away I thought things were good.  At the time I had no idea how much had changed over time.  Over the past six months the fever has stayed away and my energy level has continued to increase, so much so that I don’t even recall when the last time was that I felt this good.  Even having the flu last week didn’t bother me. Okay, I mean it wasn’t fun, and it wiped me out at the time, but it was different.  Plus, I knew it would pass in a few days or so.

In addition to my health, I’m so thankful for my family and my friends.  My family and friends are my world.  They shape my life and are there for me to lean on when I’m not feeling strong. I have an incredible support system all of whom I’m very thankful for.

I know it may sound corny to some, but I’m thankful for my pets too.  To me, pets are a little piece of God.  They make me laugh, they snuggle when I’m down or need a hug.  They have definitely challenged me to make me a stronger person.  And at the end of the day, no matter what I’ve said or done, no matter how the rest of the day has gone, they are there for me, giving their unconditional love.

And my dear friends, I’m thankful for all of you, who take a couple of minutes out of your busy days to stop and read my blog.  I appreciate you.  I appreciate your comments.  I read them all and appreciate the feedback.

I hope everyone had a blessed and Happy Thanksgiving.

Kate